Silent Features

Anything and everything silent photoplay!
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BettyLouSpence
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Re: Silent Features

Post by BettyLouSpence »

Look what movie's being shown on Tuesday :)

From this site:
Little girl wearing a cloche hat stands in front of a motion picture theater entry arch. Written on the image is Lillian and Madison. Family members identified her as Lillian Joyce Ryckman (later Faurote, 1922-1993) and estimated 1926-1927 based on her age and the movie release dates. Posters advertise "King of the Kitchen," "Dancing Mothers," and "One Increasing Purpose," all silent films.
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"No, Vico! You'd make a marvelous second husband—but you're too much of a luxury for a poor girl's first venture!" ~ Kitty Flanders in Children of Divorce (1927)

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donnie
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Re: Silent Features

Post by donnie »

How about that! :D

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BettyLouSpence
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Re: Silent Features

Post by BettyLouSpence »

I just finished watching The Ocean Waif. This is a really charming film. The amount of deterioration did make the story a bit hard to follow at times, and the missing footage did make it feel a tad rushed, but even then it didn't hurt the film that much. I really liked the camerawork in this; some shots have such lovely natural lighting. An example that comes to mind is when Millie is walking up the stairs in the mansion, and the sunlight is streaming from the windows onto the railings. Just something magical about that.

Doris Kenyon has a whimsically serene presence. Does... does that make sense to anyone else? :lol: Okay, I know that's paradoxical; but I think it's the way that she can easily pull off a sophisticated "old timey" dress complete with a crinoline (which I geeked out at when I saw it), and yet is just at home in those cute overalls. I think it's also all in the smile :D

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Jon Mirsalis' piano score was also a beautiful compliment to the film.

Tangentially related, and about that crinoline again: here's Polish vintage fashion enthusiast Karolina Żebrowska showing a 150 year old Victorian crinoline:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xPMPuKLOD5Y
"No, Vico! You'd make a marvelous second husband—but you're too much of a luxury for a poor girl's first venture!" ~ Kitty Flanders in Children of Divorce (1927)

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donnie
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Re: Silent Features

Post by donnie »

BettyLouSpence wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 1:11 am
I just finished watching The Ocean Waif. This is a really charming film. The amount of deterioration did make the story a bit hard to follow at times, and the missing footage did make it feel a tad rushed, but even then it didn't hurt the film that much.
I’m so glad you watched this! :db: I thought you would like it. :D

Yes, shame about the condition. There must be a good bit missing re that subplot with Sem (played by Fraunie Fraunholtz, who is more usually a comic actor, by the way, and one that Guy used a lot).
BettyLouSpence wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 1:11 am
I really liked the camerawork in this; some shots have such lovely natural lighting. An example that comes to mind is when Millie is walking up the stairs in the mansion, and the sunlight is streaming from the windows onto the railings. Just something magical about that.
Yes!! :D And also how about that moment when she’s first entering the mansion through the window in the moonlight?
BettyLouSpence wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 1:11 am
Doris Kenyon has a whimsically serene presence. Does... does that make sense to anyone else? :lol: Okay, I know that's paradoxical; but I think it's the way that she can easily pull off a sophisticated "old timey" dress complete with a crinoline (which I geeked out at when I saw it), and yet is just at home in those cute overalls. I think it's also all in the smile :D
Yes, that’s a perfect description. She seems to have a childlike quality, like that ability a child has to be in a mostly unhappy situation and yet still be delighted and fascinated in a moment at hand.
BettyLouSpence wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 1:11 am
Tangentially related, and about that crinoline again: here's Polish vintage fashion enthusiast Karolina Żebrowska showing a 150 year old Victorian crinoline:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xPMPuKLOD5Y
That’s really interesting. To show you how ignorant I am about clothes, I didn’t even know what crinoline meant. I thought it was a kind of cloth or something. :roll: Are those hoops actual bones? Whalebone? I wonder why the upper ones were removed. I wonder what the cost of a thing like that would have been at the time. Pretty expensive, I imagine. And I wonder what she paid for this one? :o

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BettyLouSpence
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Re: Silent Features

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Yes!! :D And also how about that moment when she’s first entering the mansion through the window in the moonlight?
That was such a magical shot :he:
Are those hoops actual bones? Whalebone?
Steel was the most popular material, though there were also indeed hoops of whalebone. Some were even made of cane. The steel was a lightweight wire, and would've been very flexible.
I wonder why the upper ones were removed. I wonder what the cost of a thing like that would have been at the time. Pretty expensive, I imagine. And I wonder what she paid for this one? :o
I guess they were removed to provide a more custom fit for the original owner. I'm not sure about the price, but it's possible that they weren't that expensive. There were factories that churned out thousands of crinolines per day, from hundreds of thousands of yards of steel wire. As for how much Karolina paid, however, I'm imagining quite a lot :lol:
"No, Vico! You'd make a marvelous second husband—but you're too much of a luxury for a poor girl's first venture!" ~ Kitty Flanders in Children of Divorce (1927)

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donnie
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Re: Silent Features

Post by donnie »

So, are crinolines the same as "hoop skirts," or is that two different things?

By the way, I forgot to mention that I think I saw somewhere in passing mention of a newer restoration of The Ocean Waif that may have included some additional footage. I'll have to check that out.

Edit: It’s on a 6 Blu-Ray set Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers, released in November 2018 by Kino Lorber. One Amazon reviewer states that it’s a “new version” of the film, whatever that may mean.

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BettyLouSpence
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Re: Silent Features

Post by BettyLouSpence »

donnie wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 7:13 pm
So, are crinolines the same as "hoop skirts," or is that two different things?
A crinoline is basically a 19th century hoop skirt. So, all crinolines are hoop skirts, but not all hoop skirts are crinolines. Examples of other hoop skirts include farthingales and panniers.
By the way, I forgot to mention that I think I saw somewhere in passing mention of a newer restoration of The Ocean Waif that may have included some additional footage. I'll have to check that out.

Edit: It’s on a 6 Blu-Ray set Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers, released in November 2018 by Kino Lorber. One Amazon reviewer states that it’s a “new version” of the film, whatever that may mean.
Thanks for this info! I certainly hope that new version has additional footage...
"No, Vico! You'd make a marvelous second husband—but you're too much of a luxury for a poor girl's first venture!" ~ Kitty Flanders in Children of Divorce (1927)

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donnie
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Re: Silent Features

Post by donnie »

BettyLouSpence wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 8:16 pm
A crinoline is basically a 19th century hoop skirt. So, all crinolines are hoop skirts, but not all hoop skirts are crinolines. Examples of other hoop skirts include farthingales and panniers.
Now I'm even more confused. :shock: :D
BettyLouSpence wrote:
Wed Jul 01, 2020 8:16 pm
Thanks for this info! I certainly hope that new version has additional footage...
I looked at the Kino site, but couldn't see any specific information, so might be hard to know without buying the set.

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BettyLouSpence
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Re: Silent Features

Post by BettyLouSpence »

I watched two Buster Keaton features last night: Go West (1925) and The Navigator (1924). I think Go West may be my favorite of the two—I love the bond between Buster and Brown Eyes the cow.
"No, Vico! You'd make a marvelous second husband—but you're too much of a luxury for a poor girl's first venture!" ~ Kitty Flanders in Children of Divorce (1927)

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