Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Anything and everything silent photoplay!
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Kitty
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by Kitty » Mon May 01, 2017 5:29 pm

Seven. This is from the December 1912 issue of Motion Picture Story magazine. It's kind of exciting every time I push through to another year in these :)
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You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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donnie
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by donnie » Mon May 01, 2017 7:09 pm

You know, when you read these things, it seems that there was a real wide-eyed admiration and respect for the actors and movies back then that is missing in today's jaded society. Am I right in that?

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Kitty
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by Kitty » Mon May 01, 2017 10:13 pm

You definitely are. They regarded these people as perfect untouchable beings. They were glamorous, and there was no such thing as the tabloids. They were ALWAYS talked of with praise. The movies were affordable by everyone, too. I think much of the love of film stemmed from the fact that most meant something. They made you think, and even the comedies were a technical art form.
You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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Kitty
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by Kitty » Tue May 09, 2017 12:09 am

I just started the book "When the Movies Were Young" by Mrs. D.W. Griffith, aka Linda Arvidson.
I read the first chapter. I already love her portrayal of deep emotions. I want to go back in time to yell at the then-current resident of the studio apartment. The "Chinese picture" I guess must mean Broken Blossoms. I feel bad for her; maybe she should not have gone alone. I think if someone had accompanied her, she may have had a better chance at getting what she wished.
You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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Kitty
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by Kitty » Thu May 11, 2017 3:49 pm

I Only Saw Her Hat :lol:
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You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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donnie
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by donnie » Thu May 11, 2017 5:45 pm

:lol: Wonder what "wild Pat" is?

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Kitty
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by Kitty » Thu May 11, 2017 6:50 pm

donnie wrote:
Thu May 11, 2017 5:45 pm
:lol: Wonder what "wild Pat" is?
It's funny, I didn't even give it a thought! But I found the summary for you. It seems very depressing.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0368442/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0368442/plo ... _=tt_ov_pl
Neglectful of his little home and family, Pat resorts to evil companions at the town tavern. The priest of the village gives him a strong lecture. On the priest's advice, he goes to America, leaving a solemn promise with Mary that he will never touch liquor again. He finds employment as a stoker in the boiler room of a large factory. One day he receives a letter from Mary in which she tells him that a little girl has arrived to bless their union. Pat is delighted, and while sitting in the engine room dreaming of home, the men in the boiler room, who have been drinking, pile too much coal in the furnaces, and an explosion is imminent. They flee from the room. Pat, seeing the escaping steam, hastens below, enters the boiler room, turns the safety valve and avoids a disastrous explosion. In this act of heroism, he is so badly scalded he dies in the arms of his sympathetic co-workers, after taking Mary's letter from the bosom of his shirt and kissing it in fond remembrance of her. The good priest breaks the news to his family.
- Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

I love that IMDB has Moving Picture World summaries.

Reading on, I see there is actually a Moving Picture World review, too!

A story of Ireland and America. Wild Pat is a hard drunkard at home, but the village priest induces him to go to America and brace up. He makes good in America, but is killed in averting a boiler explosion nearly caused by the carelessness of his drunken associates. The priest has to tell the wife and comfort her. Arthur Bently, the author, has provided a wholesome human picture, which has been skillfully produced by Charles Kent. The acting is commendable. Rose Tapley, as the wife, has the only role that requires highly emotional playing. Her characterization is intelligent, but has its limitations. Harry T. Nearey's part, Pat, is clearly drawn, as is the village priest, by Tefft Johnson. - The Moving Picture World, December 7, 1912
You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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donnie
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by donnie » Thu May 11, 2017 8:50 pm

Yes, that seems pretty darn depressing, all right. :cry: Thanks for supplying the background!
Kitty wrote:
Thu May 11, 2017 6:50 pm
Arthur Bently, the author, has provided a wholesome human picture, which has been skillfully produced by Charles Kent. The acting is commendable. Rose Tapley, as the wife, has the only role that requires highly emotional playing. Her characterization is intelligent, but has its limitations. Harry T. Nearey's part, Pat, is clearly drawn, as is the village priest, by Tefft Johnson. - The Moving Picture World, December 7, 1912
I think the wording they used when reviewing performances is fascinating—so different from what a critic would say today.

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Kitty
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by Kitty » Thu May 11, 2017 9:27 pm

I think it kind of changed when newsmen started changing their style. I like it, too. Makes me try to improve the way I write reviews.
You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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Kitty
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Re: Literature That Glorifies the Photoplay

Post by Kitty » Wed May 17, 2017 11:20 pm

Here's a letter of admiration to Jean, the Vitagraph Dog! This is from Motion Picture Story Magazine, May 1912.
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You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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