Poetry and Stories

This is the place for talking about vintage books, posting random vintage photos, and anything else vintage paper memorabilia!
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Kitty
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Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2017 8:57 pm

Re: Poetry and Stories

Post by Kitty » Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:23 pm

donnie wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:04 pm
Kitty wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 5:56 pm
Um? What a charming bedtime story.
:o :lol: Wow, what grisly little ditty. Wherever did you dig that one up?
I think I found that one on Twitter. :lol:
You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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donnie
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Re: Poetry and Stories

Post by donnie » Mon Jun 04, 2018 8:00 am

A detail I noticed: All the couplets are a perfect rhyme except for the last two lines. I know pronunciations change over time. I wonder if when that was written, "her" was pronounced something like "hair" to rhyme with "share"; or "share" was pronounced like "sure" to rhyme with "her".

I know that's sometimes how linguists figure out what pronunciations were like hundreds of years ago. For example, I remember learning that in the the England of the 1600's, "tea" was apparently pronounced like "tay" because of the way it was rhymed.

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Kitty
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Re: Poetry and Stories

Post by Kitty » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:39 am

donnie wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 8:00 am
A detail I noticed: All the couplets are a perfect rhyme except for the last two lines. I know pronunciations change over time. I wonder if when that was written, "her" was pronounced something like "hair" to rhyme with "share"; or "share" was pronounced like "sure" to rhyme with "her".

For example, I remember learning that in the the England of the 1600's, "tea" was apparently pronounced like "tay" because of the way it was rhymed.
I thought that same thing, that the last two lines don't rhyme to us, but if you imagine the storyteller having a thick Irish or Scottish accent, it makes sense. The Irish say 'tay' for tea all the time, and I have heard them say 'hair' for 'her'.
You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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donnie
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Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2017 8:28 am

Re: Poetry and Stories

Post by donnie » Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:55 pm

Kitty wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:39 am
I thought that same thing, that the last two lines don't rhyme to us, but if you imagine the storyteller having a thick Irish or Scottish accent, it makes sense. The Irish say 'tay' for tea all the time, and I have heard them say 'hair' for 'her'.
Yes, you're right. I had an Irish violin teacher when I was in college, and I'm pretty sure he pronounced "her" that way.

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