Your Go-To Silent Feature

Anything and everything silent photoplay!
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BettyLouSpence
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Re: Your Go-To Silent Feature

Post by BettyLouSpence » Sun Mar 25, 2018 6:26 pm

donnie wrote:
Sun Mar 25, 2018 2:40 pm
You know I've *still* yet to watch "It" all the way through. Got to remedy that!
It's a great little romantic comedy, I think you'll really enjoy it. Especially with Carl Davis' score - I can still remember the melody of the main theme.
Go ride the music!
Go ride the music!
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Go ride the music!
Go ride the music!

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Mrs. Danvers
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Location: Lost in Thought

Re: Your Go-To Silent Feature

Post by Mrs. Danvers » Fri Apr 06, 2018 12:44 pm

Good time to plug my favorites too. I like the Weimar Era German films alot.
The years between the 2 world wars was filled with an explosion of talented film makers. From the time Adolf Hitler became Germany's chancellor in 1933 to the opening salvos of World War II in 1939, about 800 actors, directors, writers, composers and producers fled Europe for the safety of America.

The Third Reich's loss was Hollywood's gain as the infusion of artistic talent changed movie making for decades to come. Among the talent were directors Billy Wilder (Double Indemnity, Stalag 17,Sunset Boulevard, Some Like It Hot), Fritz Lang ("Fury," "The Big Heat"), Henry Koster ("Harvey"), Fred Zinnemann ("High Noon," "From Here to Eternity") and Robert Siodmak ("The Killers"); composers Frederick Hollander, Franz Waxman and Erich Wolfgang Korngold; cinematographer Rudolph Mate; and actors such as Hedy Lamarr and Peter Lorre. And there were others who left Germany before Hitler took power, including director Ernst Lubitsch and actress Marlene Dietrich.

Here's the rest of that good article.
http://articles.latimes.com/2009/jan/03 ... hollywood3

Here's my list

Metropolis
Nosferatu
Der Golem
Faust
Dairy of a Lost Girl
Pandora's Box
Die Nibelungen and Kriemhild's Revenge
The Man Who Laughs
The Penalty (Lon Chaney was was beyond brilliant)
The Wind
Sunrise
Piccadilly (a British silent with Anna May Wong, she is brilliant too. And will break your heart)
The Toll of The Sea (also Anna May Wong, even sadder than the other film) WAH
When my people come to colonize this planet, your name will be on the protected rolls, and you will come to no harm.
Beldar Conehead

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donnie
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Re: Your Go-To Silent Feature

Post by donnie » Fri Apr 06, 2018 1:05 pm

Hi Deb! :D
I was interested to see The Penalty on your list. I watched that for the first time recently. Lon Chaney was indeed "beyond brilliant." What a tour de force! The ending was so sad, however.

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Kitty
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Re: Your Go-To Silent Feature

Post by Kitty » Fri Apr 06, 2018 5:44 pm

Hi, Debbie! I am going to check out some of Anna Mae Wong's films. I saw her in one--can't remember which film unfortunately--but I do remember liking her performance.
You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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Mrs. Danvers
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Re: Your Go-To Silent Feature

Post by Mrs. Danvers » Sat Apr 07, 2018 9:54 am

Hi guys, Lon Chaney had problems with his legs for the rest of his life from that role in The Penalty, from having them bound backwards for so long. He was brilliant in every film I have seen of his.

The Unknown 1927 is a real doozy. Directed by Tod Browning, also a treat, and featuring Lon Chaney as carnival knife thrower Alonzo the Armless and Joan Crawford as the scantily clad carnival girl he hopes to marry.

Chaney did remarkable and convincing collaborative scenes with real-life armless double Paul Desmuke (sometimes credited as Peter Dismuki), whose legs and feet were used to manipulate objects such as knives and cigarettes in frame with Chaney's upper body and face.

Picadilly is magical to me. She was Tiger Lilly in a 1924 Peter Pan movie, I need to find that!

https://youtu.be/XMl1LXN0fTo
When my people come to colonize this planet, your name will be on the protected rolls, and you will come to no harm.
Beldar Conehead

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Kitty
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Re: Your Go-To Silent Feature

Post by Kitty » Sat Apr 07, 2018 10:15 am

Mrs. Danvers wrote:
Sat Apr 07, 2018 9:54 am
She was Tiger Lilly in a 1924 Peter Pan movie, I need to find that!

https://youtu.be/XMl1LXN0fTo
Oh yeah!!! I forgot she was in that. Peter Pan is one of my favorites of all time!! What well made movie!
You trying to tell me you didn't hear that shriek? That was something trying to get out of its premature grave, and I don't want to be here when it does. - Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

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donnie
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Re: Your Go-To Silent Feature

Post by donnie » Sat Apr 07, 2018 1:29 pm

Mrs. Danvers wrote:
Sat Apr 07, 2018 9:54 am
Hi guys, Lon Chaney had problems with his legs for the rest of his life from that role in The Penalty, from having them bound backwards for so long.
I can believe that! I'll have to check out The Unknown.

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Mrs. Danvers
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Location: Lost in Thought

Re: Your Go-To Silent Feature

Post by Mrs. Danvers » Sat Apr 07, 2018 2:08 pm

There are quite a few of Chaney's movies on DVD, I get them our local library, movies of all types but they have a huge selection of silent movies because they can get them from any other branch for us. It's not all bad living in a one horse town.

I haven't seen that Peter Pan movie, but I bet I can find it someplace.
When my people come to colonize this planet, your name will be on the protected rolls, and you will come to no harm.
Beldar Conehead

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